As HOPE AFSCME Local 123 members, we have the power to make a difference. Through the merger, HOPE members have influence at the ballot box, in government rooms and at the bargaining table. HOPE AFSCME Local 123 is one of the city`s most powerful advocates for working families in the city of Houston. HOPE members have several opportunities to vote in the ratification process, from physical polling locations with HOPE leaders to city-specific workstations to an online voting form to visiting the HOPE office during business hours. The COVID-19 pandemic has already put stressed public services to the test. Ahead of the meeting, Turner deployed three city employees and said he planned to lay off another 3,000 workers to make up a budget deficit of nearly $US 170 million in the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. One agreement at a time has resulted in many policy formulations and improvements, ranging from compensation such as Shift Differentials and Bi-Lingual Pay to evaluation reform with HEAR to privatisation and redundancy alternatives. The aim of each negotiating team is to improve subsequent meet and conference agreements, with the experience gained by the company under previous agreements. As the only city in Texas to have such a process for unclassified community workers, HOPE members take this responsibility seriously. The Meet and Confer 2018 agreement, which has not yet been ratified, will be the 4th agreement since HOPE members were recognized by the City of Houston in December 2006. However, last week, in response to pressure from HOPE members to avoid layoffs, the City Council and Mayor agreed to use the federal funds they had received through previous COVID-19 relief plans to rehire laid-off employees and end plans to lay off thousands of other employees. The state said the city has only been able to address 163 homes since January 2019. The small numbers have raised eyebrows and the state believes they have a proven system with 2,052 homes completed in nearly 50 counties.

After 12 weeks of negotiations (with months of preparation), the members of the hope Bargaining Team and representatives of the City of Houston have reached an agreement on meet and confer 2018. Acting Assistant Secretary John Gibbs writes, «The change also eliminates the direct allocation of funds to the City of Houston. The City`s underpaid agreement is terminated and the funds are used for government programs to support the city`s reconstruction efforts. The GLO will manage support, rental and economic revitalization programs for homeowners to serve the legitimate residents of the City of Houston. «Hope is a member of AFSCME which has 1.6 million members nationally. Created in 2008, HOPE is the largest union of «municipal workers» in the state of Texas to have a binding meet and confer agreement. We are a diverse union that has enabled workers to change the culture of the city of Houston by committing to improving benefits, policies and wages. HOPE continues to work with taxpayers to make Houston a better place to live, work, invest, learn and play. We have proven that municipal workers have the know-how and commitment to make municipal government efficient, efficient and fair.

In the last sentence, the Commissioner responsible for agriculture for the GLO writes: «We hope that the City of Houston will collaborate with the GLO in future discussions on these issues.» HOUSTON — Members of HOPE Local 123 have convinced Houston city officials to do two things: support their call for Congress to provide state and local aid and remove planned layoffs of 3,000 city workers. . . .